The Silk Road & The Heads of Uzbekistan: Outside is the New Inside

COVID-19…! See, I’ve got your attention, I can’t seem to hold a conversation, watch the TV or listen to the radio without hearing the words; pandemic, lockdown or COVID-19. Now we are well versed with restrictions and what we can and can’t do, as well as things finally opening again, we are starting to find ways around the limitations and photography is no different!

The answer to methods of exhibition before we are finally released on 17th May – aside from digitally – is to stick it outside! Just behind King’s Cross Station there is an outdoor travel photography exhibition named The Silk Road: A Living History, and here my wanderlust has been temporarily numbed. Who knew King’s Cross would be a final travel destination when usually it’s just the start?

The Silk Road: A Living History features the photographer, Christopher Wilton-Steer’s journey along the historic trade route known as The Silk Road. The breath-taking images were taken over a period of four months in 2019, capturing his adventure of 40,000KM travelled by car, bus, train, ferry, horse and camel from King’s Cross to Beijing. The 160+ photographs are truly inspiring; Granary Square has never looked so good!

The Silk Road exhibition reminded me of my time in Uzbekistan, which is at the very heart of Silk Road. I found that headwear is of surprising significance in Uzbekistan.

I don’t know about you in this cold weather, but I’m still wearing hats!! So, here’s something about them from the Silk Road.

Headware is of surprising significance in Uzbekistan. Provinces, districts and even villages may have their own embroidery design with symbols that would bring good fortune to the wearer. The large sheepskin hats are traditional and designed against the freezing winter conditions. Part of the old Silk Road, they have hot summers and cold winters. But all year round they wear a lot of headware.

Provinces, districts and even villages may have their own embroidery design with symbols that would bring good fortune to the wearer. The large sheepskin hats are traditional and designed against the freezing winter conditions. Uzbekistan have hot summers and cold winters. But all year round they wear a lot of headwear, and never let weather keep them indoors! I just thought it was interesting and took some photographs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regardless of weather, and with or without hats – outside has become the new inside during this pandemic, which I guess in reality I am grateful for, many more people are taking advantage of the wonders of outside and the possibilities it brings, especially now to exhibit! I honestly can’t wait to travel once more but at least in the meantime, I can explore places through the camera lenses of others: a reason why photography is so magnificent.

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